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Bobcats symbolize the ongoing plight of small-market NBA teams

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I searched our photo database for "money" and found this photo of the Maloofs with Lil' Jon. Nice.
I searched our photo database for "money" and found this photo of the Maloofs with Lil' Jon. Nice.

The Observer story about the Bobcats' season ticket sales numbers made its way around the blogosphere, and it inspired different reactions. While I let you draw your own conclusions, and the comments appeared to be mostly positive and optimistic, because I honestly don't know whether they're good or bad, a couple other folks I read regularly have weighed in this weekend.

Tom Ziller, writing for FanHouse, lauds the Cats for taking the route they have:

This success shows another reason middling teams are always pushing for that final playoff spot instead of accepting a lottery spot and a (remote) shot at an impact draft pick. Hardcore fans may not enjoy a four-game first-round playoff blow-out very much, but casual fans do love the mild success a postseason berth signifies.

Rob Mahoney, writing for Pro Basketball Talk, repeats a thought that's long bothered me:

The "right way" to build an NBA franchise is from the ground up. Clear out contracts. Draft well. Sign value free agents to smart deals. Stay young and stay flexible, in the hope that one day an elite player will finally fall into the team's lap. Unfortunately that's not a blueprint most small-market clubs can afford to take, as the pressure to reach a certain level of commercial success ends up superseding the actual team-building strategy.

Read it all the way through. He comes close to the same conclusion Ziller does, in the end, but it's with more of a resigned tone.