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Michael Jordan still thinks he can beat Charlotte Hornets players 1-on-1

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Michael Jordan, owner of the Charlotte Hornets, has always had confidence in himself and that's something that doesn't go away with age.

Sam Sharpe-USA TODAY Sports

Michael Jordan the basketball player is considered by many to be the greatest to ever play this game. He was an incredible scorer, one of the best perimeter defenders of all time, and of course he has six championship rings to go with a spotless record in the NBA Finals. Jordan has all the reason in the world to be the most confident man in the room no matter how old he gets, and that certainly hasn't changed now that he's owner of the Charlotte Hornets.

In an interview, Jordan was asked if he could still play in today's NBA. Well of course not, he's 52 years years old and his legs started to give out on him a little over 12 years ago. The thought of him playing is....he totally said he could still play today didn't he?

"L'Equipe: Do you think you can play against some of your guys right now? Do you sometimes do that or not? Could you win on one-on-ones against them?"

"Jordan: I'm pretty sure I can, so I don't want to do that and demolish their confidence. So I stay away from them, I let them think they're good...but I'm too old to do that anyway."

(H/t CBS Sports NBA)


L'interview de Michael Jordan par L'Equipe by BasketInfos

Oh boy...well this is something nobody is gonna get worked up about are they? (People are gonna get SO WORKED UP about this) Especially considering it's something he's been saying for who knows how long now. Jordan is never going to stop thinking he can play in today's NBA, and he's certainly not going to stop believing he can beat his own guys one on one when they're putting up horrible offensive numbers like last season.

Except, we know he doesn't actually think he could beat his own players. This is a persona that Jordan has created, and one that he's going to stick to all the way to the end. He'll be saying "Yeah, I can probably score a bucket or two on these guys" when he's well into his late 60's, because that's just the guy he is. Is there some part of him that actually believes he can play in today's NBA? Sure, no doubt about it, but he's smarter than that. Jordan's an owner now, and his goal is to bring the Hornets a championship as their owner, not make a comeback as a secret ringer.