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I subjected myself to all of the NBA combine testing

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Ever wonder how an average person compares to NBA athletes?

2018 NBA Draft Combine - Day 2

We don’t get a real combine this season, but that doesn’t mean we can’t have some fun with it. I, your average joe sports fan, decided to put myself through all the combine events I could to see how I stack up against NBA prospects. To make this even better, due to the coronavirus situation, I didn’t have access to a basketball court for several months. I finally got access to a court a few days ago and went to work. Here’s how it all went down.

Anthropometrics

Height without shoes: 6’1”
Height with shoes: 6’2.5”
Wingspan: 6’3”
Standing reach: 7’11”
Hand width: 8.75”
Hand length: 8.25”
Weight: 265 pounds

Other than the weight, I have pretty normal size for an NBA point guard. A little on the short side with a short-ish reach, but very much on the heavy side. But hey, at least I have a positive wingspan, so I can’t be made fun of for having t-rex arms.

Athletic Testing

No step vertical: 23”
Max vertical: 27”
Shuttle run: 3.23 seconds
Lane agility: 13.37”
Bench press repetitions (185 pounds): 27 reps

Woo this is all over the place. My vertical is alright for the average person, but it’s not even close to acceptable for an NBA player, and especially a guard. The shuttle run is good, but that’s because I predetermined my route. At the NBA combine, they have to react to a light that tells them which way to go. I have no such equipment.

The lack of preparation really hurt me in the lane agility. I had never done it before I went out and timed myself, and my footwork was awful and clunky, to say the least. I think this would be one of, if not the worst times recorded at the combine in a very long time. Not good.

But there is one strength here, and it is my strength. I was able to rep out 185 pounds 27 times, which is infuriating. This ties the NBA record set in 2003. If only I could eek out one more rep...

Shooting
NBA spot up: 21/50 (42%)
On the move spot up (star shooting): 10/20 (50%)
Off the dribble at elbows: 12/20 (60%)
Free throws: 45/50 (90%)

I was disappointed in these numbers, but I have to share them anyway, because that’s how the process works. I couldn’t keep a rhythm in the catch and shoot drills and put up some pretty lackluster numbers. Maybe they could have been improved with more prep time.

Final Scouting Report

The shooting numbers are a red flag, but the free throw shooting shows there might be something there with a little more preparation and fine tuning. The athletic testing falls well short of what’s expected of an NBA player, but if a team needs someone to come in and repeatedly shove a small player several times, I’m their guy.