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The Charlotte Hornets 2022 NBA Draft guide, vol. 3: Post-withdrawal deadline big board

It’s top-60 time, folks.

2022 NBA Draft Lottery Photo by Jeff Haynes/NBAE via Getty Images

The list has dwindled.

Following June 1’s NBA Draft early-entry withdrawal deadline, 112 candidates removed themselves from the 2022 class and opted to return to college. Players that withdraw by June 1 retain their NCAA eligibility, whereas the deadline for international players is June 13. For example: Leonard Miller was considering Arizona, Kentucky or G League Ignite if he were not to enter the draft. Now that he waited beyond June 1, Miller can only enter the draft this year or play next season with Ignite before declaring again in 2023.

A handful of notable prospects decided to return to college next season, including NC State guard Terquavion Smith, who attended a pre-draft workout with the Charlotte Hornets. Harrison Ingram, Marcus Sasser, Drew Timme and Jalen Wilson were among the other notable withdrawals. Most prospects that have a firm draft range stayed in.

Obviously, the Hornets do not have a head coach yet, and the June 23 draft is rapidly approaching. Mitch Kupchak stated in his end-of-season press conference that he’d hoped to have a coach in place before the draft, and though there’s still time for that, the organization seemingly has some work to do in the coming weeks.

Just a general thought I’ve been having leading up to the draft; I’m fully prepared for Charlotte to make all three draft picks. It doesn’t look like packaging 13 and 15 for a higher selection will move them up much as few teams ahead of them have a need for two mid-first round selections rather than taking a shot on a top-12 prospect. It’s not the worst thing in the world, either; the team’s two best players will be 24 and 21 on opening night and the team still has four open roster spots even if the non-guaranteed contracts of Mason Plumlee, Kelly Oubre Jr. and Nick Richards aren’t moved. I don’t think it’s a bad thing to add two more players to a young nucleus since pick 45 will be used on a Two-Way or draft-and-stash player in all likelihood.

Alright, here’s the big board update with some notes on risers and fallers below. If anyone has their own personal big board going, post it in the comments! Only 17 days left until the draft.

Chase’s 2022 NBA Draft big board top-60

Rank Name Position Ht./Wt. School/team (country)
Rank Name Position Ht./Wt. School/team (country)
1 Chet Holmgren Big 7-0/195lbs Gonzaga
2 Jabari Smith Jr. Forward 6-10/220lbs Auburn
3 Paolo Banchero Forward 6-10/250lbs Duke
4 Jaden Ivey Combo 6-4/200lbs Purdue
5 Shaedon Sharpe Guard/wing 6-6/200lbs Kentucky (Canada)
6 AJ Griffin Wing 6-6/222lbs Duke
7 Jalen Duren Center 6-10/230lbs Memphis
8 Dyson Daniels Combo/wing 6-6/200lbs G League Ignite (Australia)
9 Jeremy Sochan Forward 6-9/230lbs Baylor (Poland)
10 Bennedict Mathurin Wing 6-7/195lbs Arizona (Canada)
11 Jonathan Davis Guard 6-5/196lbs Wisconsin
12 Keegan Murray Forward 6-8/215lbs Iowa
13 Blake Wesley Guard 6-5/185lbs Notre Dame
14 Tari Eason Forward/big 6-8/215lbs Louisiana State
15 Malaki Branham Guard 6-5/180lbs Ohio State
16 Dalen Terry Combo/wing 6-7/195lbs Arizona
17 Mark Williams Center 7-0/243lbs Duke
18 Jaden Hardy Guard 6-4/190lbs G League Ignite
19 TyTy Washington Point guard 6-3/185lbs Kentucky
20 Jalen Williams Guard/wing 6-6/190lbs Santa Clara
21 Ochai Agbaji Wing 6-6/214lbs Kansas
22 Ousmane Dieng Wing/forward 6-8/185lbs New Zealand Breakers (France)
23 EJ Liddell Big/forward 6-7/240lbs Ohio State
24 Patrick Baldwin Jr. Forward 6-10/205lbs Milwaukee
25 Nikola Jović Forward 6-10/209lbs Mega Bemax (Serbia)
26 Jake LaRavia Big 6-8/227lbs Wake Forest
27 MarJon Beauchamp Wing 6-6/199lbs G League Ignite
28 Bryce McGowens Wing 6-7/181lbs Nebraska
29 Justin Lewis Forward 6-7/245lbs Marquette
30 Kendall Brown Wing/forward 6-8/205lbs Baylor
31 Jaylin Williams Big 6-10/245lbs Arkansas
32 Leonard Miller Wing/forward 6-10/211lbs Fort Erie International Academy (Canada)
33 Peyton Watson Wing 6-6/240lbs UCLA
34 Andrew Nembhard Point guard 6-5/196lbs Gonzaga (Canada)
35 Hyunjung Lee Wing 6-7/210lbs Davidson
36 Julian Champagnie Wing/forward 6-8/217lbs St. John's
37 Alondes Williams Guard 6-5/213lbs Wake Forest
38 Kennedy Chandler Point guard 6-1/172lbs Tennessee
39 Max Christie Guard 6-6/190lbs Michigan State
40 Ismaël Kamagate Center 6-11/220lbs Paris Basketball (France)
41 Christian Braun Guard/wing 6-7/209lbs Kansas
42 Walker Kessler Center 7-1/256lbs Auburn
43 Jean Montero Point guard 6-3/172lbs Overtime Elite (Dominican Republic)
44 Ryan Rollins Guard 6-3/175lbs Toledo
45 Gabriele Procida Wing 6-8/193lbs Bologna (Italy)
46 Caleb Houstan Wing 6-8/205lbs Michigan (Canada)
47 Christian Koloko Center 7-0/221lbs Arizona (Cameroon)
48 Hugo Besson Guard 6-6/180lbs New Zealand Breakers (France)
49 Vince Williams Jr. Wing/guard 6-6/210lbs Virginia Commonwealth
50 Dereon Seabron Forward/guard 6-6/182lbs North Carolina State
51 Josh Minott Forward 6-8/205lbs Memphis
52 Wendell Moore Wing 6-6/217lbs Duke
53 Dominick Barlow Forward 6-10/221lbs Overtime Elite (Dumont HS)
54 Ron Harper Jr. Wing 6-6/240lbs Rutgers
55 JD Davison Guard 6-3/192lbs Alabama
56 Trevor Keels Guard/wing 6-5/224lbs Duke
57 Jabari Walker Forward 6-8/214lbs Colorado
58 Collin Gillespie Point guard 6-2/195lbs Villanova
59 Keon Ellis Guard 6-5/167lbs Alabama
60 Kenneth Lofton Jr. Big 6-7/280lbs Louisiana Tech

Risers

Dalen Terry: Between the publishing of the second volume of the draft guide and now, Terry has risen more spots than any player on my board. The positional versatility he offers as a 6-foot-7 wing that can initiate offense and score efficiently from multiple levels while playing a tough brand of defense is tough to pass up on in the middle of the first round.

Jaden Hardy: Sneakily one of the most versatile shooters in the draft, the more I watch Hardy the more I like his game. He’s not as athletic as some of the elite players of his archetype but he’s very skilled and has flashed playmaking that could warrant even more on-ball creation duty when he develops in the NBA.

EJ Liddell: If the Hornets want to lean into a small-ball centric, up-tempo offensive identity, Liddell would be a great fit. While he’s a formidable interior defender with the mobility to hold his own in space, his floor-spacing and passing are tailor made for a role-playing big in the NBA and solidify him as a first-round prospect in my book.

Malaki Branham: Though Branham only moved up one spot for me since the last update, he’s garnered some buzz in the Hornets draft range. Jeremy Woo selected him for the Hornets at 15 in his latest mock draft for Sports Illustrated, and Liddell’s Ohio State teammate has a well-rounded scoring package that doesn’t often fall far outside of the lottery.

Fallers

Kendall Brown: While I understand the sell on Brown as a high-feel, low-usage off-ball cutter and finisher that offers some intriguing defensive versatility, I don’t buy his jumper as of now and if he isn’t at least an average shooter, I’m personally not a fan of drafting that player archetype in the top-25.

Ochai Agbaji: This is purely an upside thing for me, and that’s not to say Agbaji won’t improve in the NBA. It’s just tough for me to envision him as anything more than a 7-9th man on a competitive playoff team given his limitations as a creator and passer while not offering high-level defense or switchability.

Hyunjung Lee: It pained me deeply to take Lee out of the top-30, as he’s one of my five favorite prospects in the draft. A dynamite shooter at 6-foot-8 with impressive feel for finding open lanes and taking the best angle to snaking around screeners and get off a quick three, Lee will likely be available at 45, has a higher ceiling and is currently a more complete prospect than both Scottie Lewis and Arnoldas Kulboka.

I’ve watched my fair share of games in the last month or two and I continually come away more impressed with the top-20 or so prospects in this class. There are good players to be found all over the board this year and I’m excited to see how things shake out.